Tag Archives: Green-Spotted Puffer

Lawnmower Blenny report…and more.

1 Mar

I’ve had the Lawnmower Blenny in my saltwater tank for about 3 weeks now. He’s doing well. He’s fun to watch, he perches high on the rocks and coral like a bird surveying his domain. He’s a great little fish, but…well, the truth is, he is not making a dent in the algae.

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He picks at it, but I never see him really grab a chunk and just EAT it. It’s pick, pick pick, but the algae in my tank appears the same. Buy one, but don’t expect miracles.

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Last week, in a shocking turn of events, my two Ocellaris Clownfish began attacking my Green-Spotted Puffer. The Clowns were relentless. They have always dominated the Puffer but suddenly they were really trying to kill him. I haven’t noticed any spawning behavior from the Clowns that would make them so vicious. After 3 days of this I had to remove the Puffer. He’s in a smaller tank for now, and I am adding some freshwater to his tank every day to make it brackish. (salty but not saltwater)

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Since the Puffer is no longer in the salt tank I realized that I can add snails for algae control. We have a Petco nearby and I bought 3 Turbo Snails at $3 each. I took 5 hours to transition them to my tank conditions and they are doing well.

CAM02716They are not traveling much but they don’t have to. The bottom is literally a bed of food for them.

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Now the sad part of the story. I also bought a little Blue Damselfish. When I first set up this aquarium, over 6 years ago, the first fish I bought was a little Blue Damsel. He got along great with these two Clownfish and the Royal Gramma, who are, as I always say, over 6 years old.

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That original Damsel lived over two years and I believe he died of old age. He didn’t die suddenly, he deteriorated over a period of many weeks. I mention all of this because I was so hopeful that another Blue Damsel could live in this tank. The splash of Electric Blue would make this tank PERFECT.

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At first, the Damsel stood up to the Clowns. But on Day Two the Damsel was in hiding. I fed a big dose of baby brine shrimp into the tank to make sure he could eat without coming out. I expected him to hide a few days and learn how to cope but on Day Three I found him dead. Quick as that. I have to ponder whether I will try it again. Did the Clowns actually kill the Damsel? Or was the shock of going from the wild to the store to my tank too much? I just can’t stand knowing all that fish went through only to die in the middle of Iowa in a 42 gallon fish tank. This just haunts me.

Another tank! Bigger is better.

17 Oct

CAM01690I bought a used 42-gallon glass bowfront tank for my Saltwater fish.

CAM00069I set the tank in front of the old one, trying to see how it would look. The stand is nice but it was nicked-up and it was too much wood for our living room.

CAM00070The old tank was 37 gallons. This tank has more “floor-space” which is most useful to fish instead of height.

CAM01097So I went to work….OK OK a little lie there…my wife went to work. She is very talented when it comes to painting and refinishing. First she sanded the stand.

CAM01098Then she cleaned it.

CAM01102And painted it. Now this makes it look easy, but she spends a lot of time and makes it perfect.

CAM01105Hmmm, much better!

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Cloudy water for one day.

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Just needed a background, so I got to work…

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…I mean , my wife made the background.  Jeesh, what is this, the Spanish Inquisition?

In a few months I will have had my 2 Clownfish and one Royal Gramma for 6 years!  A Green-Spotted Puffer lives with them, too.

Green-Spotted Puffers need special care

23 Apr

Those fat little Puffers are so cute, aren’t they?  I know it! I just had to get one last year.

There is a lot that you should know about keeping a Green-Spotted Puffer, or GSP, and I highly recommend you search other websites about them BEFORE you buy one.

Two very important things are to keep the Puffer in brackish water (that’s salty water but not as salty as the Ocean) and also to have a supply of snails as a food item. The snails keep their beak trimmed down.

Please, don’t buy one until you are ready. I’m afraid they are dying in captivity by the thousands and thousands every year.

Here’s mine eating some pond snails earlier today:

Snails are useful, even to your plants

31 Dec

I have the two most common types of freshwater snails in my aquariums. The Common Pond Snail and the Maylasian Trumpet Snail.

The Maylasian Snails spend their time under the sand or gravel, slowly churning things up, then coming out at night and climbing on the glass and everywhere else. I figure that they are eating leftover food in the gravel, and basically converting it into fertilizer for my plants.

The Pond Snails are good in two ways. You might see them crawling on your plants and think they are destroying them. They may nibble on them a bit BUT, more importantly, they are scraping the algae off of the plant leaves. My tanks with the healthiest plants have healthy populations of snails.

Some snails and this African Cichlid cleaned the algae off this Java Moss.

I bought a Yo-Yo Loach a few years ago (and lost him in the giant Ich outbreak that I had in 2010), and I put him in a community tank full of plants and fish and snails. It took a few months but the Loach ate all the snails. Then, within a few weeks the plants started to be coated with algae. I had to scrape the glass more often, the plants were getting choked.

I suggest keeping a healthy population of snails. What happens if you get too many? Seriously, squish the pond snails. Pop them against the glass and your fish will love them, very nutritious. The trumpet snails are hard to crush, you can remove them by hand. Just turn on the lights in the middle of the night sometime, they will be all over the place.  Or borrow a snail-eating fish like a Clown Loach or other Botia species, or a Puffer that is acclimated to fresh water.

I have a Green-Spotted Puffer in a brackish tank and he gets a few snails on most days. Crrrrunch.