Archive | April, 2014

Rare sighting of Flying Aquarium Fish

1 Apr

A few months ago I was lucky enough to see one of the rarest sights that fish-keepers can see.

I went downstairs to feed the fish and a tankful of young Angelfish had escaped from their tank and were flying around the basement.  I fumbled for my cell-phone and snapped some photos.

CAM01885I didn’t understand how this could be happening!  I was going Click-click-click with the camera.

CAM01875   I could hear a gentle buzzing sound.

CAM01872Their little fins were beating like a Hummingbirds!!

CAM01876I turned to run upstairs and tell my wife what was happening. Then I heard splashing. The fish were diving back into the tank!

A moment later they were cruising around the surface begging to be fed, like nothing strange had occurred!! Oh, my head was spinning. I walked up to the tank and sprinkled in some food. They ate like they were starving!

You can imagine my shock at all of this. I took two days off of work trying to figure out if I was going crazy. Eventually I started searching the Internet Aquarium Forums , using a fake name of course, and asked for anyone to share their experiences with me about aquarium fish flying around the house.

Well, what I learned was a big surprise. One of the most common of the flying fish are Angelfish. They have skinny, light-weight bodies and when they get into the air their fins can beat 1,000 times per minute. That explains the sound I heard. And, it seems that young Angelfish are most likely to be seen while flying. They are young and excited and are so busy goofing off they don’t notice the human approaching.

But, they can’t fly very long. The fins dry quickly and they must return to water within a minute or so. Plus, they can only eat while in the aquarium. They need a little sip of water to help swallow their food.

If you have goldfish you can forget about seeing them fly. They are too fat, simple as that. Here is my Black Moor Goldfish:

He can barely swim, much less fly.

He can barely swim, much less fly.

One fish that is built to fly is the Pufferfish. For years it was thought that Puffers inflate themselves to save them from a predators bite. But that is not true. The Puffers inflate and then quickly rise into the air. They float around like a blimp, safe from the sharks and turtles below.

Credit for photo found at "puffer fish smile" at Galleryhip.com

Credit for photo found at “puffer fish smile” at Galleryhip.com

I know this information may come as a surprise to you and I don’t want to alarm anyone who has Eels or Piranhas.

Credit for photo at footage.shutterstock.com

Credit for photo at footage.shutterstock.com

Eels are too thin to fly. If they escape the aquarium the worse they can do is slither across the floor and go up your pants leg.

Piranhas are simply too dumb to return to the aquarium. I have heard that they fly out of the tank and dash about a few seconds before crashing into a wall or the floor, never to regain consciousness.

Please feel free to add your comments and experiences regarding this subject. In this way, we can make a contribution to an obscure facet of scientific knowledge.

Meanwhile, I’ll turn on one of my favorite albums from the 70’s and ponder those Tales From Topographic Oceans. Rock on, fellow fish lovers!

tales